When Your Crisis is Because of a Microphone Goof-up

durst movie gerard braudBy Gerard Braud

Robert Durst went to the bathroom with a wireless microphone on. Now he’s facing murder charges. It is an interesting crisis case study.

Yes, he’s faced legal troubles associated with three suspicious murders associated with him. But those were in his past until he agreed to be interviewed for an HBO documentary about… well, the allegations that he murdered three people. During a break during the filming, he wore a wireless microphone into the restroom. The camera, meanwhile, was still rolling.

Since 1994, in every media training class I’ve taught, each participant has been told, “Assume the camera is always rolling and that the microphone is always recording.”

robert durstDurst, while in the restroom, said to himself, while still wearing the film crew’s wireless microphone, “What the hell did I do? I killed them all of course.”

Crews transcribing the videotape found this audio gem and alerted the authorities. It is also a brilliant publicity stunt for HBO to bring this to light as they aired their five-part series on Durst.

Would you ever think that a microphone goof-up could create a crisis that could take over the life of a spokesperson? Durst has been interviewed before. He should have known better.

For all of you who must do interviews with the media, the lesson is to assume the microphone is on and that the camera is rolling and recording at all times. Presidents have been burned by this and news anchors have been burned as well.

Fox News Reporter John Roberts in the scrum of reporters covering the Robert Durst hearing in New Orleans.

Fox News Reporter John Roberts in the scrum of reporters covering the Robert Durst hearing in New Orleans.

While standing outside of Orleans Parish Criminal Court today I was reminded of anchor’s being burned when I saw Fox News reporter John Roberts. His wife Kyra Philips was burned on CNN when she wore her microphone into the bathroom and said some personal things, while President Bush was giving a speech on the one-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. The audience heard everything she said.

Rule 1: Only put the microphone on just before the interview starts.

Rule 2: If you whisper anything to anyone while wearing the microphone you can assume the audio technician and the videographer will hear you, among others.

Rule 3: If you have to go to the bathroom, take the microphone off.

Rule 4: As soon as the interview is over, take the microphone off.

Cold Facts About High Bills: Crisis Communications Tips for Angry Customers

electric cooperative high bills gerard braudBy Gerard Braud

Today’s crisis communications tip looks at what happens when angry customers take to Facebook to complain about your company. Complaints on your Facebook page or complaints on a Facebook group page built for and by the complainers is creating public relations problems for companies.

All of us can learn from this perfect crisis communication lesson — It can be found at every utility company, where customers who are angry about their high winter bills and are venting their frustration and anger on Facebook.

Many utility companies do exactly what they should not do: They do nothing.

The men and women in leadership positions at both investor owned electric companies and rural electric cooperative companies have spent decades practicing the art of hope, as in, “I hope this just goes away.”

Hope is not a crisis communications strategy, especially in the age of social media.

However, engaging with these angry customers on Facebook can be problematic because social media is filled with traps.

Trap 1: If you comment on a post that is either positive or negative, it can lead to an exponentially high number of negative responses.

Trap 2: If you comment on any Facebook posts, it sends it to the top on everyone’s news feed.

What do you do?

Solution One: Fix the problem and/or make the anger and hostility go away. The reality is there will never be a refund for electricity used. And chances are, the customer has forgotten that their bill was likely this high during the coldest month of the year 12 months ago and just as high during the hottest month of the year six months ago. But they would rather blame their electric winter storm cleoncompany than to take personal responsibility.

The solution is to manage the expectations of the customer by eliminating the peaks and valleys in their bill by offering an option to have what many companies call bill averaging or bill levelization. It means the customer will see nearly the same amount on their bill every month. Often, it will reduce this month’s $400 bill to an easier to pay $250 bill, which makes the customer happier.

Solution Two: Take the discussion offline. In many cases, the best way to handle an angry customer is to have customer service pick up the phone and call them directly. Customer service is able to demonstrate the type of soothing, personal concern that would be lost on a Facebook post.

Make the Crisis Go Away

The problem with the, “I hope it goes away” philosophy is that the problem will go away within the next two months as spring arrives and many customers use little, if any heating or air conditioning. But the problem will return during the hottest month of the year, then go away, then return next winter.

If you have a solution that can make the crisis go away once an for all, then by all means do it.